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  issue > facts

Many of the facts below apply to inhumane dog and cat breeding throughout the United States, animal overpopulation or the pet industry in general.

We are trying to gather more facts specific to Minnesota. The collection of data about dog and cat breeders and animal ‘production’ in Minnesota is difficult due to the fact that the State does not license this industry; therefore, measurements and accountability are minimal or non-existent.

NOTE: Statistics can vary based on source and year collected. Please refer to various research and sources for accuracy of data.

NOTE: Facts and figures can be extremely helpful in understanding an industry, market conditions and animal issues — not only to those in the industry but to citizens and policy-makers. However, facts alone may not tell the entire story. See commentary at end of this page.

NOTE: In 2012, The AVMA released the U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook. LINK: https://www.avma.org/KB/Resources/Statistics/Pages/Market-research-statistics-US-Pet-Ownership-Demographics-Sourcebook.aspx

The AVMA uses the following calculation to determine number of dogs or cats ‘owned’ by households in Minnesota

• Dogs: approx. number of MN. households x .372 = number of dog-owning households x 1.7 = number of dogs as pets in Minnesota

• Cats: approx. number of MN. households in 2008) x .324 = number of cat-owning households x 2.2 = number of cats as pets in Minnesota

 

FACTS AND FIGURES

53% - Minnesota households who owned a pet in 2011 (places MN at 42nd for pet ownership in the nation)

Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

31.9% - Minnesota households who have a canine

Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

29.7% - Minnesota households who have a cat

Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

63.2% - percentage of pet owners who consider their animals to be members of the family in 2011; this is up from 49.7% in 2006
Source: Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

74.1 million - estimated number of pet cats in the United States
Source: 2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

70 million - estimated number of pet dogs in the United States
Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographics Sourcebook, AVMA

$375 - average veterinary care expense per household for all pets in 2011

NOTE: Between 2006 and 2011, the precentage of pet owners who didn't visit a veterinarian at all rose 8 percent for those ith dogs, and 24 percent for cat owners.

Source:  2012 U.S. Pet Ownership & Demograhics Sourcebook, AVMA

10,000 - estimated number of puppy mills in the U.S. (licensed and unlicensed)

Source: HSUS Fact Sheet, 2013

2.15 million - estimated number of puppies sold annually who originated from puppy mills - USDA licensed and non-USDA licensed

Source: HSUS Fact Sheet, 2013

3 million - estimated number of puppies euthanized by shelters every year in the U.S.

Source: HSUS Fact Sheet, 2013

114,457 - estimated number of female dogs kept for breeding at USDA licensed facilties

2,024 - number of USDA Class A and B licensed facilities that breed dogs for the pet trade

NOTE: For other Puppy Mill Fact and Figures: HSUS Fact Sheet

36 - number of USDA-licensed (Class A and Class B) dog/cat breeder and brokers in Minnesota as of 2013 - a drop of over 60% over past 6 years; many now sell over the Internet, which is unregulated by the USDA
Source: United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Unknown - number of total dog and cat breeders in Minnesota
Source: No State law to collect data

 

OTHER FACTS AND FIGURES

Dates of data belwo need to be verified; check source listed for updates.

7-9 million - approx. number of dogs acquired in the United States each year
Source: MSNBC

43% - percentage of dogs who sleep in same bed as their owners (Other studies report 60-80% of dogs share the same bed with their owner at night.)
Source: American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn. (APPMA)

$41 billion - estimated amount Americans spend per year on their pets (more than the gross domestic product of all but 64 countries in the world); expected to hit $52 billion in next two years. Includes food, vet care, supplies, grooming, boarding, live animal purchases, supplies, medicine, etc.
Source: Source: American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn. (APPMA); Business Week; August 6, 2007; The Pet Economy

two-thirds - number of pet-owning households that have more than one pet
Source: American Veterinary Medical Association

over 20%  - number of pet-owning households who have at least five pets
Source: American Veterinary Medical Association

11,500-12,000 - approx. number of pet stores in the United States
Source: Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC)

3,500-3,700 - number of total U.S. pet stores that sell cats and dogs
Source: Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC)

300,000-400,000 -  estimated number of puppies sold every year through pet stores,
Source: Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC)
The Humane Society of the United States estimates a higher range, 300,000-500,000, of puppies are sold every year through pet stores.

27 - number of states and the District of Columbia who have enacted laws which establish some form of humane care standards for animals kept at pet shops and sold in a retail environment
Source: Born Free; United With Animal Protection Institute

200,000 - number of American families who bought puppies online in 2004
Source: American Pet Products Manufacturers Association; cited by Doris Day Animal League

25%-30% - estimated number of animals euthanized in shelters who are purebred. In some regions, 50% are purebred.  
Source: HSUS; Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science

3 - average number of litters a fertile cat can produce in one year; 4-6 average number of kittens in a feline litter
Source: Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) NOTE: Others argue the average is 2 litters with an average of 4 kittens per litter due to kitten death.

2 - average number of litters a fertile dog can produce in one year; 6-10 average number of puppies in a canine litter
Source: Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) NOTE: Others argue the average number of puppies is 5 due to puppy death.

Over 56% - number of dogs and puppies entering shelters who are killed, based on reports from over 1,055 facilities across America.
Source: National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy—Shelter Statistics Survey (1997)

4,000-6,000 - estimated number of animal shelters in the United States
Source: Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)

38% - percentage of public who acquire pet from breeders or pet stores; 14% acquire from shelters; 48% get pets as strays, from friends or from animal rescuers
Source: HSUS; The Bill Foundation

30% - percentage of dog guardians who are aware of pet-overpopulation problem
Source: Massachusetts SPCA survey 1993; The Bill Foundation

55% - percentage of dogs relinquished to U.S. animal shelters who were unaltered; 47% of surrendered cats were unaltered
Source: Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science; based on study of 12 U.S. animal shelters; The Bill Foundation

$16,400 - average cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven
Source: Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)

$2,100 - one-time costs for a dog, such as crate, spay-neuter, emergency vet care
Source: American Kennel Club

$2,500 - average annual costs for a dog’s food, grooming, vet check ups, pet-sitting fees, etc. Giant dogs: $3,321; medium dogs: $2,628; small dogs: $1,831
Source: American Kennel Club

42.7% - percentage of pet owners who have a large dog; 22.5% own a medium dog; 11.7% own a tiny dog
Source: American Kennel Club

 

FACTS AND FIGURES — ASPCA: How many pets are in the United States? How many animals are in shelters?

The data below comes from: http://www.aspca.org/about-us/faq/pet-statistics.aspx

NOTE: Date of research is not listed.

Facts about U.S. Animal Shelters:
There are about 5,000 community animal shelters nationwide that are independent; there is no national organization monitoring these shelters. The terms “humane society” and “SPCA” are generic; shelters using those names are not part of the ASPCA or the Humane Society of the United States. Currently, no government institution or animal organization is responsible for tabulating national statistics for the animal protection movement.

  • Approximately 5 million to 7 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year, and approximately 3 million to 4 million are euthanized (60 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats). Shelter intakes are about evenly divided between those animals relinquished by owners and those picked up by animal control. These are national estimates; the percentage of euthanasia may vary from state to state.
  • According to the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy (NCPPSP), less than 2 percent of cats and only 15 to 20 percent of dogs are returned to their owners. Most of these were identified with tags, tattoos or microchips.
  • Twenty-five percent of dogs who enter local shelters are purebred. (Source: NCPPSP)
  • Only 10 percent of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered, while 78 percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered, according to the American Pet Products Association (Source: APPA).
  • More than 20 percent of people who leave dogs in shelters adopted them from a shelter. (Source: NCPPSP)

    Facts about Pet Ownership in the U.S.:
  • About 62 percent of all households in the United States have a pet. (Source: APPA)
  • About 78.2 million dogs and about 86.4 million cats are owned in the United States. (Source: APPA)
  • According to the National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy (NCPPSP), about 65 percent of pet owners acquire their pets free or at low cost.
  • The majority of pets are obtained from acquaintances and family members. Twenty-six percent of dogs are purchased from breeders, 20 to 30 percent of cats and dogs are adopted from shelters and rescues, and 2 to 10 percent are purchased from pet shops.
  • At least one-third of cats are acquired as strays. (Source: APPA)
  • More than 20 percent of people who leave dogs in shelters adopted them from a shelter. (Source: NCPPSP)
  • The cost of spaying and neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for one year.
  • The average cost of basic food, supplies, medical care and training for a dog or cat is $600 to $900 annually. Seventy-eight percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered. (Source: APPA)

    Facts about Pet Overpopulation in the U.S.:
  • It is impossible to determine how many stray dogs and cats live in the United States; estimates for cats alone range up to 70 million.
  • The average number of litters a fertile cat produces is one to two a year; the average number of kittens is four to six per litter.
  • The average number of litters a fertile dog produces is one a year; the average number of puppies is four to six.
  • Owned cats and dogs generally live longer, healthier lives than strays.
  • Many strays are lost pets who were not kept properly indoors or provided with identification.
  • Only 10 percent of the animals received by shelters have been spayed or neutered, while 78 percent of pet dogs and 88 percent of pet cats are spayed or neutered.
  • The cost of spaying or neutering a pet is less than the cost of raising puppies or kittens for a year.

    The following data are ASPCA estimates unless otherwise indicated.

 

SOURCES 

There are a variety of sources to obtain data. A few to check:

American Veterinary Medical Association

American Pet Products Manufacturers Association
Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC)
The Humane Society of the United States

ASPCA
Born Free
United With Animal Protection Institute
American Pet Products Manufacturers Association

Animal People

COMMENTARY

Animal People in April 2013 wrote the following. (See link below for full article.)

http://www.animalpeoplenews.org/anp/2013/04/30/documents-u-s-pet-ownership-demographics-sourcebook-2012-edition/

“Published every five years,” says the AVMA promotional literature, “this report [U.S. Pet OWnership Demogrpahics Sourcebook, 2012 edition] provides statistical data on the population of pets in the United States, including dogs, cats, birds, horses, and other pets,” including “geographic breakdowns, detailed household characteristics comparing owners of pets with non-owners, and veterinary use and expenditures.”

The executive summary to the U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographic Sourcebook, 2012 edition notes the first decline in pet-keeping in the U.S. to be documented in 85 years of studies known to ANIMAL PEOPLE––and probably the first decline in pet-keeping ever. The overall decline was modest, a mere 2.4%, but bird-keeping dropped by 20.5%, despite the soaring popularity of keeping backyard chickens; horse-keeping fell 16.7%; keeping exotic pets, rabbits, rodents, and reptiles dropped 16.5%; keeping cats fell 6.2%; and even keeping dogs declined by 1.9%.

The U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographic Sourcebook delves only lightly into whys and wherefores. It notes, for example, that the popularity of keeping birds as pets has now fallen 46% in 20 years, without mentioning that this coincides with the passage of the Wild Bird Conservation Act of 1992, which cut off the supply of cheap parrots, parakeets, finches, and lovebirds who were then plentifully available even in department stores.

A factor in the decline of cat-keeping may be the reduced numbers of feral-born kittens needing homes. A factor in the decline of dog-keeping may be the reduced availability of dogs other than pit bulls at animal shelters: 85% of dog-keepers indicated a preference for getting their next dog from a shelter (45%) or rescue group (40%). Another 10% preferred to pick up a stray. But while about 30% of the dogs entering shelters are pit bulls, according to annual ANIMAL PEOPLE surveys, only about 16% of adopters choose a pit bull.

Among the more alarming findings reported in the U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographic Sourcebook, 2012 edition, attributed by the compilers to the depressed economy of recent years, is that “The percent of pet-owning households making no trip at all to the veterinarian in 2011 increased by 8% for dogs and a staggering 24% for cats.”


 


 

 

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